Category Archives: KPC

KPC News – Daily Updates

admin   July 9, 2015   Comments Off on KPC News – Daily Updates

You can be aware of the latest KPC and other carbapenemases news on a daily basis. Every day there are up to 10-15 KPC news stories. We sort them, weed out the duplicates and then create two things. A free daily newsletter, and our Twitter feed. Save yourself hours and be informed in ways that will practically help you, whether… Read more »

How is the KPC superbug treated

The KPC superbug is a highly drug resistant form of Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. It resists most carbapenem drugs and is sometimes also known as CRKP. It is treatable in some cases by Colistin or Tigecycline. Colistin is an old drug that doctors prefer not to use because of it’s toxic effect on the kidneys. Tigecycline is also not regarded as… Read more »

What are KPC superbug symptoms

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a type of bacteria that causes a number of different types of  infection in hospitals or the community. Symptoms found in K. pneumoniae infections are related to the specific part of the body affected. Please note that only a test can confirm you have a drug resistant KPC and that the lists below are a general guide… Read more »

What is Klebsiella Pneumonia?

The KPC superbug is a highly drug resistant K. pneumoniae bacteria, which is the cause of Klebsiella pneumonia. The main drugs that it is resistant to are the carbapenems. This has given rise to the KPC initials. This bacteria inflames the lungs and can produce a thick, bloody, mucoid sputum. The bacteria typically leak from the mouth, nose and throat… Read more »

What is the KPC superbug?

Infection Watch   September 16, 2012   Comments Off on What is the KPC superbug?

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a rod shaped type of bacteria commonly found in the normal flora of the mouth, skin, and intestines. K. pneumoniae can in turn cause an infection called klebsiella pneumonia. This can provoke lung inflammation and cell death that may produce a thick, bloody, mucoid sputum. This often happens after the bacteria migrate from their normal place of resting to the lower respiratory tract…. Read more »